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Carmel Eve's Blog

This post walks through the fix for DLL locking errors when trying to deploy an Azure Function. The solution was to switch over to the new “deploy from package” option when deploying the functions. This fixes the file locking problem because instead of deploying the DLLs, the function will run from a package file added to its directory.


This is the fourth blog in a series which delves into how the Rx operators work under the covers. This series aims to provide a greater understanding of Rx and its operators. This post focuses on the WINDOW operator.


This is the third blog in a series which delves into how the Rx operators work under the covers. This series aims to provide a greater understanding of Rx and its operators. This post focuses on the GROUP operator.


The complexities around Azure Active Directory can be difficult to understand. This post runs through some of the key concepts – AAD apps, service principles, managed identities, and walks through an example of how to set some of this up!


This is the second blog in a series which delves into how the Rx operators work under the covers. This series aims to provide a greater understanding of Rx and its operators. This post focuses on the AGGREGATE operator.


This is the first blog in a series which delves into how the Rx operators work under the covers. This series aims to provide a greater understanding of Rx and its operators. This post focuses on the WHERE operator.


At endjin we’ve done quite a lot of work around reactive data processing. This post is a great introduction to the main concepts in reactive programming. It runs through the main classes in Rx.NET and provides an easy-to-follow explanation of this powerful (and somewhat complex) area of .NET.


Overflowing with dataflow part 2: TPL Dataflow

by Carmel Eve

This is the second blog in a series about data flow. This post delves into TPL dataflow.

The task parallel library is a .NET library which aims to make parallel processing and concurrency simpler to work with. The TPL dataflow library is specifically aimed at making parallel data processing more understandable via a pipeline-based model.


Overflowing with dataflow part 1: An overview

by Carmel Eve

This is the first blog in a series about dataflow. The series focuses on TPL dataflow, but this post gives an overview of dataflow as a whole.

The crucial thing to understand when using dataflow is that the data is in control. In most conventional programming languages, the programmer determines how and when the code will run. In dataflow, it is the data that drives how the program executes. The movement of data controls the flow of the program.


Anyone can be a role model. You don’t have to be a veteran in the industry to inspire someone. There are constantly people coming through the pipeline behind you, and in that there is an opportunity to make a real difference.

What can you do to drive positive change and help combat the gender imbalance in the tech industry?


This is a post about the importance of reducing your dependencies as much as possible when designing solutions.

If as much as possible is under your own control, there is far less room for synchronization errors and update conflicts.


Here is a quick dive into encryption and blockchain. This post goes into the ideas behind hashing, and how these translate into encrypted messaging techniques. It also delves blockchain and how signing and versioning allow for consistent and immutable transactions. Definitely worth a read if you’re interested in these concepts!


Everyone learns differently. In this post Carmel describes how OneNote can be used to aid and enhance research. As an avid note taker and blogger, she highlights how the ability to Ctrl-F into written text in OneNote has greatly improved her productivity!


Garbage collection is the process in .NET of cleaning up unused memory. Here is a great post which explains how it works under the covers. If you have ever wanted to get an understanding of exactly what is going on behind the scenes when you write C# code, then this is the post for you!


Here is a post that Carmel wrote not long after she started back at endjin. Time has really flown since then, but it provides some great insight into how our apprenticeships work!

If an apprenticeship and endjin sounds like something that might be of interest to you, send your CV over to hello@endjin.com!


Carmel describes her two month paid summer internship at endjin Carmel is studying a Physics MPhys at the University of Manchester. She made contact in April because she was looking to gain some real world software development experience during her summer break, before her final year at University. During her two month internship we tried to expose […]