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Engineering Practices

Agile Architecture: Painting by Numbers

by Howard van Rooijen

I originally wrote this post in 2007 (now lost in the annals of time), and is one of my favourite posts. I’m very fond of the confluence of ideas and the serendipity of discovering someone amazing from another discipline articulating the same thoughts I was having. During one of the Open Space sessions I attended […]


At endjin we have a high quality bar when it comes to our code. As part of this we carry out regular code reviews. One of the tools we have used for these code reviews is NDepend. This is the second in a blog series written as we carried out that process. This post focuses on the insight you can quickly gain just by glancing at the NDepend UI.


Enforce resource tagging with Azure Policy

by Mike Larah

This blog post details how we used Azure Policy to enforce Azure resources were tagged with appropiate tags and ensured tags were inherited from parent resource groups where possible.


At endjin we have a high quality bar when it comes to our code. As part of this we carry out regular code reviews. One of the tools we have used for these code reviews is NDepend. This is the first in a blog series written as we carried out that process. This post runs through the different metrics used by NDepend, and the reasons that each of these can be an indication of code quality.


ML.NET, Azure Functions and the 4th Industrial Revolution

by Howard van Rooijen

TLDR; There is a lot of hype around AI & ML. Here’s an example of using ML.NET & Azure Functions to deliver a series of micro-optimisations, to automate a series of 1 second tasks. When applied to business processes, this is what the 4th Industrial Revolution could look like. We’re in the 3rd major hype […]


When he joined endjin, Technical Fellow Ian sat down with founder Howard for a Q&A session. This was originally published on LinkedIn in 5 parts, but is republished here, in full. Ian talks about his path into computing, some highlights of his career, the evolution of the .NET ecosystem, AI, and the software engineering life.


This is the second blog in a series which delves into how the Rx operators work under the covers. This series aims to provide a greater understanding of Rx and its operators. This post focuses on the AGGREGATE operator.


Explicit interface implementation

by Ed Freeman

Two of the main use-cases for explicit interface implementation are: 1. to hide members of the interface in a class which inherits from that interface, and 2. to work around the scenario when a class is inheriting from two interfaces which share a member of the same name. Take a look at this blog to go into more depth about each of those scenarios.


A good test suite should validate behaviour across your code base, testing as many edge cases as reasonably possible. A common “edge case”, is passing a null value when a value isn’t expected to be null. In Specflow, all values used in scenario examples are treated as strings, so it isn’t possible (by default) to pass in a null value. However, using “Step Argument Transformations”, we can achieve the desired behaviour. Read this blog to learn how this can be implemented.


At endjin we’ve done quite a lot of work around reactive data processing. This post is a great introduction to the main concepts in reactive programming. It runs through the main classes in Rx.NET and provides an easy-to-follow explanation of this powerful (and somewhat complex) area of .NET.


Overflowing with dataflow part 2: TPL Dataflow

by Carmel Eve

This is the second blog in a series about data flow. This post delves into TPL dataflow.

The task parallel library is a .NET library which aims to make parallel processing and concurrency simpler to work with. The TPL dataflow library is specifically aimed at making parallel data processing more understandable via a pipeline-based model.


Async pitfalls: deferred work and resource ownership

by Ian Griffiths

Asynchronous code has many traps for the unwary. In fact, it has plenty of ground that’s treacherous even for pathologically careful coders. For example, certain ways of using asynchrony can reduce the control you have over concurrency and ordering. This can result in subtle bugs, particularly when the asynchronous work operates on shared underlying resources. […]


This is a post about the importance of reducing your dependencies as much as possible when designing solutions.

If as much as possible is under your own control, there is far less room for synchronization errors and update conflicts.


I’m very excited that Ian Griffiths has joined endjin as a “Technical Fellow”. This is a new career pathway branch we created especially for Ian, as he didn’t really fit into any of our existing roles; his skills and expertise exemplify a pathway that many software engineers desire, but few have the opportunity to achieve […]


Garbage collection is the process in .NET of cleaning up unused memory. Here is a great post which explains how it works under the covers. If you have ever wanted to get an understanding of exactly what is going on behind the scenes when you write C# code, then this is the post for you!


As an apprentice engineer at endjin, you cover a lot of ground, especially at a consultancy which works with the latest and greatest tools to solve its clients’ problems. Learn about endjin’s Modern Data Platform, which is a culmination of IP, processes and knowledge built from years of implementing high-performance data-driven solutions. Also learn about the types of tools an apprentice gets to use, and the types of things an apprentice learns along the way.


OpenAPI code generators for Visual Studio

by Howard van Rooijen

Building RESTful APIs is a common activity at endjin. If you’ve seen our API Maturity Matrix, you’ll realise that we spend quite a lot of time thinking about the strategy, governance, legal, commercial, and operational side of building APIs along with the standard concerns of design, development, quality, infrastructure and support. One of the most […]


The diversification of .NET technologies – from Windows Desktop Applications using WPF and WinForms, UWP, ASP.NET and ASP.NET Core, “portable” libraries, the various flavours of .NET Standard, .NET Core (and portable executables on MacOS and Linux) – have brought with them incompatibilities, and a huge problem with older (but well-used) libraries that aren’t built for […]


One very useful but little used pattern when working with Resource Manager templates, is the ability to use parameters to optionally deploy resources, constrain certain resource configurations based on other user defined parameters, or to toggle parameters based on other values. To give a couple of concrete examples, imagine we have a highly reusable template […]


In the world of DevOps, cloud and platform services, how does a developer’s “definition of done” need to change? This post argues that as the silos of development and operations are broken down, the responsibility of understanding the whole solution increases meaning, to truly take advantage of the cloud, the need for quality and professionalism is critical for success.