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Combining MEF With Castle.Windsor For Low-Ceremony Component Composition Registration by convention In the last part of this series, we looked at the basic features of Castle.Windsor, and saw how we can register types explicitly in the container. Rather than having to explicitly register everything, we’d like somehow just to know what we want to install […]


Combining MEF With Castle.Windsor For Low-Ceremony Component Composition Last time, we looked at MEF and what it brings the to party. (The answer was a very powerful composition solution.) This time, we’re going to contrast that with the facilities offered by Castle.Windsor. Part of the solution — Castle.Windsor Windsor takes as its primary focus the […]


Introducing Templify

by Howard van Rooijen

[Note: Templify 0.7.0.25 is now available] In my last post I talked about the philosophy of “Work Smarter, Not Harder”; it’s a very simple mantra that can be described in three simple steps: Do, Recognise, Codify. This philosophy is at the very core of what we do at endjin so we decided to share the […]


Combining MEF With Castle.Windsor For Low-Ceremony Component Composition In the last part of this series, we looked at the scope of the component discovery and composition problem. This time, we’re going to look at MEF and see what it brings to the table. Part of the solution — MEF MEF is principally trying to solve […]


Combining MEF With Castle.Windsor For Low-Ceremony Component Composition Introduction This is the first post in the endjin series on developing a loosely-coupled, ReSTful application architecture for .NET. Here’s a rough synopsis of the series. Component discovery and composition Part 1: Fundamentals Interlude 1 — Using conventions in your solution structure Component discovery and composition Part […]


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