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Building a secure solution on Azure can be a daunting task. Using Azure Functions and Managed Identities, we have built up a pattern for giving services access to one another, woithout the need to store credentials. These managed identities can be given access to necessary resources. For example, they can be granted roles and added to access control lists in ADLS Gen2 accounts, or the ability to access keys in key vault. This means that data can be securely accessed without needing to store connection strings or app passwords.


This is the second blog in a series around design patterns. This post focuses on the builder pattern. The builder pattern is used when there is complex set up involved in creating an object. Like the other creational patterns, it also separates out the construction of an object from the object’s use.


Whilst some of the Azure Active Directory PowerShell for Graph module (AzureAD) functionality has been rolled into the new Azure PowerShell Az module, it’s not currently (and might never be) a replacement for the full power of what you can achieve with AzureAD. So, there’s every chance you’ll find yourself needing to use both side-by-side. This post explains how to do that using the new cross-platform PowerShell Core.


Here is a blog written by our apprentice Carmel after her second year of the apprenticeship. We think it demonstrates the huge variety of things we get to work on here at endjin, and highlights the best of the blogs that Carmel produced through during the year – of which there were a lot!

If you think an apprenticeship with us is something which might interest you – send a CV through to hello@endjin.com!

Category: Culture, Experience

This is the first blog in a series about design patterns. This blog focuses on the differences between the factory method and abstract factory patterns. The factory method is a method which takes the creation of objects and moves it out of the main body of the code. An abstract factory is similar to the factory method, but instead of a method it is an object in its own right.


A Power BI based solution typically consists of a variety of technologies – for example Azure data platform services containing source data. As such, automation of Power BI resources needs to be considered as part of a wider DevOps strategy. This post describes the specific steps needed in order to fully automate the creation and security of Power BI workspaces using Powershell and Azure DevOps pipelines.


Here at endjin we’ve done a lot of work around data analysis and ETL. As part of this we have done some work with Databricks Notebooks on Microsoft Azure. Notebooks can be used for complex and powerful data analysis using Spark. Spark is a “unified analytics engine for big data and machine learning”. It allows you to run data analysis workloads, and can be accessed via many APIs. This means that you can build up data processes and models using a language you feel comfortable with. They can also be run as an activity in a ADF pipeline, and combined with Mapping Data Flows to build up a complex ETL process which can be run via ADF.


Endjin is a Snowflake Partner

by Howard van Rooijen

I’ve very pleased to announce that endjin has become a Snowflake partner. This fantastic “designed for the cloud” data platform redefines what a data warehouse can be in the age of cloud. With features such as data sharing, usage based billing, and availability on Microsoft Azure, it has won our hearts. Over the last three years, we’ve […]


Five editions? Already? How time flies. The Power BI Weekly newsletter is proving a great success – we’ve just published the fifth edition, hundreds of people have subscribed and we’ve received lots of kind feedback. I think it’s safe to say that Power BI has become omnipresent in recent times. We use it widely here at endjin […]

Category: Business Insights

Software architecture and Agile project planning are often seen to be at odds. However, here at endjin we think that the way in which they intersect solves a lot of the common issues surrounding architecture. The key to successful architecture is constantly keeping the drivers in mind and having a tight communication loop as the architecture is implemented. These concepts are ones which are key to agile project management, and the combination of these two disciplines can be extremely powerful and successful when applied correctly.


Agile Architecture: Painting by Numbers

by Howard van Rooijen

I originally wrote this post in 2007 (now lost in the annals of time), and is one of my favourite posts. I’m very fond of the confluence of ideas and the serendipity of discovering someone amazing from another discipline articulating the same thoughts I was having. During one of the Open Space sessions I attended […]


Mapping Data Flows are a relatively new feature of ADF. They allow you to visually build up complex data transformation sequences. This can aid in the streamlining of data manipulation and ETL processes, without the need to write any code! This post gives a brief introduction to the technology, and what this could enable!


In the last post I explained how to create a set of Azure Functions that could load data into Snowflake as well as execute Snowflake queries and export the results into your favorite cloud storage solution. In this post I will show how we can use these functions in Azure Data Factory to plug Snowflake […]


If, like me, you are a fan of Azure Data Factory and love Snowflake then you are probably disappointed that there isn’t a native Data Factory connector for Snowflake. While we wait for an official connector from Microsoft we have no alternative but to roll our own. In this blog post I will walk you through […]


Announcing Power BI Weekly!

by Howard van Rooijen

We launched Azure Weekly, a free weekly newsletter, back in 2014. 200+ issues and many thousands of global subscribers later, it’s still going strong. Last month Ed Freeman pointed out that analytics section of Azure Weekly was mainly full of Power BI articles and that it was by far the largest category in the newsletter. […]

Category: Analytics

At endjin we have a high quality bar when it comes to our code. As part of this we carry out regular code reviews. One of the tools we have used for these code reviews is NDepend. This is the second in a blog series written as we carried out that process. This post focuses on the insight you can quickly gain just by glancing at the NDepend UI.


Enforce resource tagging with Azure Policy

by Mike Larah

This blog post details how we used Azure Policy to enforce Azure resources were tagged with appropiate tags and ensured tags were inherited from parent resource groups where possible.


At endjin we have a high quality bar when it comes to our code. As part of this we carry out regular code reviews. One of the tools we have used for these code reviews is NDepend. This is the first in a blog series written as we carried out that process. This post runs through the different metrics used by NDepend, and the reasons that each of these can be an indication of code quality.


C# faux amis 3: variable declarations and type patterns

by Ian Griffiths

In this, the final article in a series on the potentially deceptive nature of some new features in C# 8, Ian Griffiths shows how using var can sometimes result in better compile-time type checking than using an explicit type. He reflects on the evolution of C#, and what we can learn from this.

Category: Development

C# v8.0 introduces various new patterns. In this article, part of a series on how the evolution of the language has added complexity, Ian Griffiths shows how the strong resemblance between the new Positional Patterns and Deconstruction can be misleading.