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GitFlow

The Problem If you use Git (and GitFlow) with Visual Studio (which seems like it is going to become a much more popular combination), I’m sure you are well aware of the pain that is the “merge conflict” you often encounter when trying to merge (or rebase) a branch. There are three file types that […]


This blog explains how you can use the Git client SmartGit to follow the GitFlow model, which Howard described in his series a step by Step Guide to using GitFlow with TeamCity. GitFlow GitFlow specifies a standard branch structure and workflow for moving changes between branches, which standardise the way a team uses Git, and […]


Part 1 of the series talked about Different Branching Models. Part 2 covered GitFlow – a Branching Model for a Release Cycle and part 3 covered all the GitFlow Commands. In this final part of this series about adopting GitFlow, we’re going to cover how we can use the exciting new feature branching abilities of TeamCity 7.1 to allow […]


In part 1 of the series I talked about the difference in branching models inherent with the different types of version control system. In part 2 I talked about the problems inherent in the software development, release and support cycle and how GitFlow was designed as a workflow to try and solve or at the […]


In Part 1 – I covered off a brief overview of the branching model differences between TFS and Git. One of the most interesting developments to happen in the Git ecosystem (apart from its growing adoption rate) is the creation of the Git Flow branching model and its embodiment as an plugin extension to the core Git client libraries. […]


When we setup endjin in 2010, there were five activities we did on day one: set up a business bank account, set up a FreeAgent account, for all our accounting needs signed up for Office 365 (or BPOS as it was then), registered the endjin GitHub account built a virtualised Continuous Integration Environment using TeamCity. […]