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Whilst “read/write XMLA endpoint” might seem like a technical mouthful, its addition to Power BI is a significant milestone in the strategy of bringing Power BI and Analysis Services closer together. As well as closing the gap between IT-managed workloads and self-service BI, it presents a number of new opportunities for Power BI developers in terms of tooling, process and integrations. This post highlights some of the key advantages of this new capability and what they mean for the Power BI developer.


Despite being inherently difficult to test, the need to validate data modelling, business rules and security boundaries in Power BI reports is important, as well as the need for ensuring that quality doesn’t regress over time as the insights evolve. This post explains that, by connecting to the underlying tabular model, it is possible to execute scenario-based specifications to add quality gates and build confidence in Power BI reports, just as any other software project.


Whilst testing Power BI Dataflows isn’t something that many people think about, it’s critical that business rules and associated data preparation steps are validated to ensure the right insights are available to the right people across the organisation. Data insights are useless, even dangerous, if they can’t be trusted, so despite the lack of “official support” or recommended approaches from Microsoft, endjin treat Power BI solutions just as any other software project with respect to testing – building automated quality gates into the end to end development process. This post outlines an approach that endjin has used to test Power BI Dataflows to add quality gates and build confidence in large and complex Power BI solutions.


Power BI Dataflow refresh polling

by Ed Freeman

If you’re a frequent user of the Power BI REST API and Power BI Dataflows, you may have come across the problem that there’s seemingly no programmatic way to get the refresh history of a Dataflow. The ability to know the status of a refresh operation is useful when you’re performing automated operations, and you need to know that something has succeeded or failed before deciding what to do next. For example, a desired feature in the Power BI Service is to be able to refresh a dataflow, and automatically refresh a dataset that depends on that dataflow. Without a refresh history endpoint, this is made more complicated than necessary. This blog outlines a way to programmtically retrieve a Dataflow’s refresh history in order to poll a refresh operation’s status, useful for any fully automated scenario.


Power BI Data Type Mappings

by Ed Freeman

If you’ve worked with Power BI at all, you’ll have probably realised that there are numerous mediums through which you work with (potentially the “same”) data. Data types across these mediums can be called different things, but actually refer to the same thing. They can also (unsurprisingly) be called different things and actually mean different things. It’s useful to know what the corresponding data types are across these mediums, as you may need to, for example, convert queries from one format to another. This blog and containing report intend to clarify what the corresponding data types are across each of the separate mediums within Power BI.


A Power BI based solution typically consists of a variety of technologies – for example Azure data platform services containing source data. As such, automation of Power BI resources needs to be considered as part of a wider DevOps strategy. This post describes the specific steps needed in order to fully automate the creation and security of Power BI workspaces using Powershell and Azure DevOps pipelines.


Five editions? Already? How time flies. The Power BI Weekly newsletter is proving a great success – we’ve just published the fifth edition, hundreds of people have subscribed and we’ve received lots of kind feedback. I think it’s safe to say that Power BI has become omnipresent in recent times. We use it widely here at endjin […]


Announcing Power BI Weekly!

by Howard van Rooijen

We launched Azure Weekly, a free weekly newsletter, back in 2014. 200+ issues and many thousands of global subscribers later, it’s still going strong. Last month Ed Freeman pointed out that analytics section of Azure Weekly was mainly full of Power BI articles and that it was by far the largest category in the newsletter. […]


Are you performing time-intelligence calculations in your Power BI report? Are you using either the CALENDAR or CALENDARAUTO DAX function to create your date table? Care needs to be taken when choosing the generation method for your date table when performing time-based comparisons. This is where it becomes important to understand the implications of generating a date table using the CALENDAR function and CALENDARAUTO function in Power BI. This blog will outline the considerations you need to make whilst designing the measures in your report.


Sometimes you want to build a Power BI dashboard that pulls in data from two different data sources. In this blog post Alice Waddicor demonstrates how you can use DirectQuery and multiple databased via ElasticQuery.


We have produced an insightful booklet called “Embracing Disruption – Financial Services and the Microsoft Cloud” which examines the challenges and opportunities for the Financial Service Industry in the UK, through the lens of Microsoft Azure, Security, Privacy & Data Sovereignty, Data Ingestion, Transformation & Enrichment, Big Compute, Big Data, Insights & Visualisation, Infrastructure, Ops & Support, and the API Economy.


With Power BI now in public preview everywhere, you don’t need to be a “data scientist” to do data science! Power BI is a powerful tool for visualising performance, user interactions and other data for your applications. There is so much useful data sitting passively in various storage accounts, hiding interesting trends or unwanted behaviour. […]