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Despite being inherently difficult to test, the need to validate data modelling, business rules and security boundaries in Power BI reports is important, as well as the need for ensuring that quality doesn’t regress over time as the insights evolve. This post explains that, by connecting to the underlying tabular model, it is possible to execute scenario-based specifications to add quality gates and build confidence in Power BI reports, just as any other software project.


Whilst testing Power BI Dataflows isn’t something that many people think about, it’s critical that business rules and associated data preparation steps are validated to ensure the right insights are available to the right people across the organisation. Data insights are useless, even dangerous, if they can’t be trusted, so despite the lack of “official support” or recommended approaches from Microsoft, endjin treat Power BI solutions just as any other software project with respect to testing – building automated quality gates into the end to end development process. This post outlines an approach that endjin has used to test Power BI Dataflows to add quality gates and build confidence in large and complex Power BI solutions.


Using complex objects in BDD Scenarios with SpecFlow

by Jonathan George

During our projects at endjin, we often find ourselves evangelising Behaviour Driven Development, and specifically SpecFlow. In this post we look at a technique for defining complex test data objects in your Gherkin feature files, which we’ve also made available via the endjin-sponsored Corvus.NET project.


If you use Azure Functions on a regular basis, you’ll likely have grappled with the challenge of testing them. Even now, several years after their introduction, the testing story for Functions is not hugely well defined. In the final post in this series, we show how to ensure specs written using Corvus.SpecFlow.Extensions can run as part of your build pipeline.


If you use Azure Functions on a regular basis, you’ll likely have grappled with the challenge of testing them. Even now, several years after their introduction, the testing story for Functions is not hugely well defined. In the fourth of this series of posts, we look at how configuration can be supplied from your tests to the functions apps being tested.


If you use Azure Functions on a regular basis, you’ll likely have grappled with the challenge of testing them. Even now, several years after their introduction, the testing story for Functions is not hugely well defined. In the third of a series of posts, we look at using classes in the Corvus.SpecFlow.Extensions library to run functions apps via scenario and feature hooks.


If you use Azure Functions on a regular basis, you’ll likely have grappled with the challenge of testing them. Even now, several years after their introduction, the testing story for Functions is not hugely well defined. In the second of a series of posts, we look at using step bindings provided by the Corvus.SpecFlow.Extensions library to run functions apps as part of your SpecFlow scenarios.


If you use Azure Functions on a regular basis, you’ll likely have grappled with the challenge of testing them. Even now, several years after their introduction, the testing story for Functions is not hugely well defined. In the first of a series of posts, we look at some different approaches to testing your functions apps, and introduce the Corvus.SpecFlow.Extensions library.


A good test suite should validate behaviour across your code base, testing as many edge cases as reasonably possible. A common “edge case”, is passing a null value when a value isn’t expected to be null. In Specflow, all values used in scenario examples are treated as strings, so it isn’t possible (by default) to pass in a null value. However, using “Step Argument Transformations”, we can achieve the desired behaviour. Read this blog to learn how this can be implemented.


SpecFlow Extensions for Azure Storage Emulator

by Howard van Rooijen

In most cases, when writing an integration specifications against Azure Storage, you want to use the real thing rather than the Storage Emulator as the performance profile and behaviours are noticeably different. One exception is if you’ve hosted your code in a public repo; in this case you really don’t want to commit your real […]


One of the great benefits of using SpecFlow is that it allows you to write your specifications in a human readable format. Learn how you can create reusable step argument transformations to apply custom transformations to your parameters, so that you can keep your specifications easy to read.


25 useful steps missing from SpecFlow

by Howard van Rooijen

Over the last 5 years, we at endjin have tried to fully embrace Behaviour Driven Development (BDD). We’ve tried just about every framework that has been released into the .NET Ecosystem and we’ve even written our own when we found edge cases the others didn’t support. Most of these frameworks have been based on traditional […]